The Fishing Team with the catch – Egypt Today The Fishing Team with the catch – Egypt Today

Hamata: Feel the fishing adrenaline of the Red Sea

Thu, Jun. 15, 2017
CAIRO – 15 June 2017: Fishing trips are considered by many both a sport and an ultimate relaxation vacation. Hamata, an area in the Red Sea governorate, is one of the best spots on the Red Sea to go fishing for days in a boat.

"The best thing about fishing is the adrenaline shot that comes with fighting a huge, strong fish. It sometimes takes us up to half an hour fighting to pull a heavy, strong fish," Ahmed Hussein, an amateur fisher who goes fishing for days during vacation, told Egypt Today.

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A basic breakfast on the ship – Egypt Today

The kind of the catch depends on the season. The Blackspot Emperor, Red Porgy, and Grouper are among the finest fish. Sometimes Hussein and his fishing companions accidentally catch sea turtle or a small shark from the sea rich with marine life, but they release them back into the water.

A road trip usually takes 12 hours from Cairo, and it starts at night to arrive by sunset and start the trip early. You may choose to travel by your private car or rent a private bus that usually costs an average of LE 3,000 to 5,000 ($165-276) for the round trip.

It is advised to bring a cooler and fill it with ice prior to landing on the ship. Depending on your professional level, you may bring your own fishing equipment or use what is provided on the ship.

At Hamata Port, the ship must be reserved in advance - usually a month or two ahead of the fishing season. An average trip that lasts for four days and goes far into the sea costs LE 4,000-8,000 ($220-440) per day, accommodating eight to 12 people.

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A ship on Hamata Port – Egypt Today

Always check the weather forecast to make sure you stay safe, and choose the season in advance to land a good catch. Have some over-the-counter medicine handy for seasickness and headache, as well as any medication you consume regularly.

Special cooking skills are used on freshly caught fish. The ship crew covers fresh fish in large amounts of salt before inserting them into the oven of the small onboard kitchen; a raw and easy yet delicious method of enjoying organically raised fish. Surprisingly, this method makes extra tender, well-cooked fish that only has a little trace of salt left in its juicy meat.

"Marine life must be respected first and foremost," said Hussein, emphasizing the proper choice of timing, fishing spot and equipment to make the lower impact possible on nature.

He condemned fishers who use nets that dive 10 centimeters into the sand before the ship pulls it, killing all marine life that it crossed in the process.

Although this method may bring a good catch for the ship for the time being, it destroys fish food and hatching eggs, leaving the near future with decreased amounts of fish available for fishing.

Another concern raised by Hussein is that fishers catch fish that have just arrived in the Egyptian sea to lay their eggs, before giving them the chance to do so. Had they been left to lay eggs, fishermen would find massive amounts of Blackspot Emperors, a high quality meat producing fish that is well known in the Red Sea. Hence, fishers should avoid fishing in the areas where the fish lay their eggs during such times, he said.
 
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