National Museum of Egyptian Civilization holds live workshop to introduce ‘Takfit’

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Wed, 08 Sep 2021 - 02:11 GMT

Part of the exhibited works at NMEC - ET

Part of the exhibited works at NMEC - ET

CAIRO – 8 September 2021: The National Museum of Egyptian Civilization organized a live workshop to introduce the Takfit craft, in the presence of one of the most important Egyptian families who worked in the Takfit for many generations, and sought to develop and promote it.

 

 

 

The event witnessed a great turnout and remarkable interaction, especially from the youth, who were keen to follow up on and document the workshop on social media. The event also attracted the museum's foreign and local visitors alike.

 

 

 

The workshop introduced the museum’s visitors to the art of Takfit, and the technique used in the manufacture of metal pieces, with a live application of the process of engraving, grafting and shrouding.

 

 

Part of the live workshop held in NMEC - ET
Part of the live workshop held in NMEC - ET

 

 

 

To enhance the experience, the museum's curators were keen to display a number of Islamic artifacts belonging to the art of Takfit, to create a link for the public between the historical piece displayed in the museum and what is being manufactured.

 

 

 

In the reception area, the museum also displayed a number of handcrafted pieces, the most prominent of which is a tray with a diameter of 165 cm and a weight of 33 kg of red copper, which is the most difficult to engrave and suffice with silver. It took several years to manufacture, and 11.3 kg of fine Swiss silver caliber 999 was used. It is the largest of its kind in Egypt.

 

 

 

Head of the Museum Authority Ahmed Farouk Ghoneim said that there are great and diverse efforts being made to establish cultural activities and creative events to consolidate skills and capabilities among the different layers of society, as well as show the impact of Egyptian civilization on various global cultures. He praised the cultural role played by the Museum of Civilization for entertainment and for receiving targeted arts that entertain the public intellectually and culturally and contribute to achieving development and civilization prosperity.

 

 

 

The Takfit craft  is one of the most prominent metal sculpting arts. It is one of the oldest crafts known to the Egyptians, and its beginning dates back to the Mamluk era. Its makers excelled by using primitive materials such as a hammer, to transform a cheap metal such as copper into a precious piece of art.

 

 

To enhance the experience, the museum's curators displayed a number of Islamic artifacts made through Takfit, to create a link for the public between the historical piece and what is being manufactured.

 

 

 

In the reception area, the museum displayed a number of handcrafted pieces, the most prominent of which is a tray made of red copper, with a diameter of 165 cm and a weight of 33 kg, the largest of its size in Egypt. Red copper is the most difficult to engrave. Some 11.3 kg of fine Swiss silver caliber 999 was also used to manufacture the tray that took several years to be completed. 

 

 

 

Head of the Museum Authority Ahmed Farouk Ghoneim said that great efforts are being exerted to hold cultural activities and events that aim to teach various skills for the different layers of society, and show the impact of Egyptian civilization on various global cultures. 

 

 

 

Ghoneim praised the cultural role played by the Museum of Civilization in disseminating arts that contribute to achieving development and prosperity.

 

 

 

The Takfit craft is one of the most prominent metal sculpting arts. It is one of the oldest crafts known to Egyptians, as it dates back to the Mamluk era. Its makers excelled by using primitive materials, to transform a cheap metal such as copper into a precious piece of art.

 

 

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