Ancient-origins sheds light on discovery of 250 graves carved into rocks in Egypt’s Sohag

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Thu, 20 May 2021 - 07:58 GMT

250 graves carved into rocks at different levels of a mountain façade in the Al-Hamidiyeh cemetery near Sohag - ET

250 graves carved into rocks at different levels of a mountain façade in the Al-Hamidiyeh cemetery near Sohag - ET

CAIRO – 20 May 2021: Ancient-origins shed light on the discovery of hundreds of ancient tombs in Egypt, where the Ministry of Tourism and Antiquities announced the discovery of 250 graves carved into rocks at different levels of a mountain façade in the Al-Hamidiyeh cemetery near Sohag.

 

 

 

The total number might soon exceed 300 graves in the area located in the city center near the old cities of Aswan and Abidos. This discovery is the latest in a series of recent Egyptian archaeological discoveries.  

 

 

 

Putting this latest discovery in context, the use of the burial complex extends over more than 2000 years of Egyptian history, from the Old Kingdom era, which included Pharaoh Khufu [Cheops], who built the Great Pyramid of Giza, to the time of Cleopatra's death in approximately 30 BC, an event marking the end of the Ptolemaic dynasty.

 

 

 

Among the models discovered for tombs is a cemetery dating back to the end of the Old Kingdom, consisting of an entrance leading to an exhibition hall and a burial well in the southeast, which is a sloping corridor leading to a small burial room. The well was reused again in later ages.

 

 

 

This tomb is characterized by the presence of an illusion door with remains of hieroglyphic inscriptions, in addition to the presence of remains of depictions of the tomb owner while sacrificing animals and people making offerings for the deceased.

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