Tarek El-Molla, Egypt's Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his office in Cairo, Egypt, October 29, 2015 – Reuters Photo Tarek El-Molla, Egypt's Minister of Petroleum and Mineral Resources, speaks during an interview with Reuters at his office in Cairo, Egypt, October 29, 2015 – Reuters Photo

Egypt has potentials to be regional energy hub in Eastern Mediterranean: Min.

By: MENA
Thu, Mar. 14, 2019
CAIRO - 14 March 2019: Petroleum Minister Tarek el Molla said Thursday that Egypt has the potentials that enables it to be a regional energy hub in the Eastern Mediterranean.

Speaking at a session titled "Eastern Mediterranean Gas Renaissance," which is part of activities of CERAWeek 2019 in the US, the minister said that Egypt has all the necessary infrastructure and facilities to transport natural gas from gas fields discovered in the Eastern Mediterranean region to European markets thanks to its extensive network of pipelines and liquefied natural gas (LNG) plants in Damietta and Idku on the Mediterranean coast.

He further underlined that the maritime border demarcation agreement between Egypt and Cyprus had positively helped in accelerating the discovery and development of gas fields in the Eastern Mediterranean region.

He also stressed the European Union's support for Egypt's tangible steps to be a regional oil and gas hub.

He deemed Egypt's hosting of the first ministerial meeting of the East Mediterranean Gas Forum (EMGF) in January as a strong start to boost the gas market in the region.

On Wednesday, Mulla had a meeting with US Energy Secretary Rick Perry on means of boosting bilateral cooperation in the petroleum and gas fields.

The meeting was held on the sidelines of his participation in "CERAWeek" by IHS Markit that kicked off in downtown Houston, on Monday, March 11.

CERAWeek, the week-long event, focuses on providing meaningful dialogue, aimed at solving the various challenges facing the energy industry―from geopolitics and trade to costs, price volatility, environmental policy, disruptive technologies, inter-fuel competition, and the battle to attract younger workers before they commit to other industries.

The on-going energy transition has created considerable uncertainty for long-term strategy and investment.

The conference opened with a discussion about geopolitical hot spots that are threatening regional stability and could hamper energy development and delivery.
 
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