Super League breakaway in tatters after English clubs quit

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Wed, 21 Apr 2021 - 06:58 GMT

European soccer’s breakaway Super League project lay in tatters on Tuesday after the six English Premier League clubs involved in the project quit 48 hours after agreeing to join Italian and Spanish teams in the controversial elite competition.

After a storm of protests from fans, players, managers and governments, alongside threats of bans and sanctions from the game's European and world governing bodies UEFA and FIFA, the English clubs capitulated under pressure and threw in the towel.

Manchester City were the first to back out of the venture and then Arsenal, Manchester United, Liverpool and Tottenham Hotspur and Chelsea announced they were following suit.

 

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The Super League had argued that it would increase revenues to the top clubs and allow them to distribute more money to the rest of the game.

U.S. investment bank JP Morgan (JPM.N) was brought in to finance the new league, providing a 3.5 billion euro ($4.21 billion) grant to the founding clubs to spend on infrastructure and recovery from the impact of the COVID-19 pandemic.

However, the sport’s governing bodies, other teams and fan organisations said the Super League would boost the power and wealth of the elite clubs and the partially closed structure of the league goes against European football's long-standing model.

Unlike Europe’s current top-level Champions League competition, where teams have to qualify through their domestic league, the founding Super League teams would have guaranteed themselves a place in the new competition every year.

 

Most of the English clubs made only brief statements but Arsenal apologised to their fans for being involved.

"It was never our intention to cause such distress, however when the invitation to join the Super League came, while knowing there were no guarantees, we did not want to be left behind to ensure we protected Arsenal and its future.

 

"As a result of listening to you and the wider football community over recent days we are withdrawing from the proposed Super League. We made a mistake, and we apologise for it," the London club said in an open letter to fans.

 

The magnitude of the split in the game and the strength of feeling it generated led political leaders across Europe to speak out, and, in some cases, to threaten intervention.

British Prime Minister Boris Johnson said his government would consider passing legislation to stop the breakaway, likening the plans to creating a cartel.

The Premier League said it “unanimously and vigorously” rejected the plans. After a meeting with the 14 clubs not involved, it said it was considering “all actions available” to stop the new competition.

"We have listened carefully to the reaction from our fans, the UK government and other key stakeholders," Manchester United said in a statement.

 

"We remain committed to working with others across the football community to come up with sustainable solutions to the long-term challenges facing the game."

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