Far away from the crowded city, there are underwater newly-made statues to attract tourism not only on land, but also under the sea in Dahab, Southeast cost of Sinai - Screen shot from CBC channel Far away from the crowded city, there are underwater newly-made statues to attract tourism not only on land, but also under the sea in Dahab, Southeast cost of Sinai - Screen shot from CBC channel

Have you been to the underwater museum in Dahab yet?

Sat, Aug. 25, 2018
CAIRO - 25 August 2018: Far away from the crowded city, there are underwater newly-made statues to attract tourism not only on land, but also under the sea in Dahab, Southeast coast of Sinai.

These statues, made of environmentally-friendly materials to preserve and protect coral reefs, were placed by a group of professional divers, the I-Drive Tribe, according to Egypt Independent.



Although the main aim of the project was to save coral reefs as per Egypt Independent, it has also attracted huge numbers of tourists to diving in Dahab and taking a look at both the statues and the corals.

In an interview with CBC, Abdul-Rahman Al Mekkawi, a prominent diver in Dahab and one of the underwater museum founders, explained that he has plans, with his colleagues, to create an underwater museum, “Egyptian Pharaohs Underwater”, that could be used for tourism and for environmental purposes and which would preserve the coral reefs too.

As Dahab is already a famous touristic destination, coral reefs and an underwater museum would generally help boost tourism ever more.

Earlier this month, Hagar Essam, a student in applied arts, decided to photograph the underwater museum as a way to show support for the idea and for her graduation project on tourism.

Hagar explained that she wanted her graduation project to be original because she likes adventure, and the presence of statues underwater surprised her. When she asked, Hagar came to learn that these statues are here for environmental purposes and tourism.

Despite not many knowing, the statues have been underwater for approximately five years and are preserving aquatic life.


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