Vehicles submerged in the flooded New Cairo streets in which water levels rose over one meter after torrential rain hit hard several parts of Cairo and Giza on Tuesday, April 25, 2018 – Egypt Today Vehicles submerged in the flooded New Cairo streets in which water levels rose over one meter after torrential rain hit hard several parts of Cairo and Giza on Tuesday, April 25, 2018 – Egypt Today

On climate change: 11 Egypt's governorates vulnerable to floods

Fri, May. 4, 2018
CAIRO – 4 May 2018: As Egypt’s climate changes, heavy rainfall is becoming more and more common, bringing dangerous flash floods. Flash flooding can make the dry ground become saturated in an instant, allowing torrents of water to rush down mountains like a waterslide, wiping away cities.

According to a report issued by the Ministry of Irrigation, 11 governorates in Egypt are potentially vulnerable to flood risks, including Aswan, Luxor, Qena, Asyut, Sohag, Beni Suef, New Valley, and South and North Sinai.

The report also showed that the Red Sea and Suez governorates are included among the risk zones that may be exposed to floods. Even New Cairo, Helwan and Maadi are identified among the risk zones.

The Delta region is also at risk of torrential rain, but not to the level of being flooded. Sewer networks are needed to discharge rainwater, the report explained, adding that some towns are built on areas that are vulnerable to flood because of the limited available space in the Nile Delta governorates.

The report warned citizens not to encroach outfall facilities by building urban buildings without obtaining the appropriate licenses from the state agencies.

Egyptian Meteorological Authority Chairman Ahmed Abdelaal stated that the heavy rains that recently hit Egypt resulted from climate change, which is affecting the whole world.

Rainfall throughout the capital caused some buildings, houses and bridges to collapse; other governorates such as Suez, Ain Sokhna and Ismailia were also affected.

Climate change and its far-reaching impact is currently the subject of numerous discussions worldwide.

Egypt is an ideal example of a developing country that is highly vulnerable to the effects of climate change and faces numerous threats to its economic, social and environmental sustainability, including energy, water and food security.

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